abiweb
online lernen

Die perfekte Abiturvorbereitung
in Englisch

Im Kurspaket Englisch erwarten Dich:
  • 28 Lernvideos
  • 92 Lerntexte
  • 320 interaktive Übungen
  • original Abituraufgaben
gratis testen

Present Continuous: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung

In diesem Abschnitt geht es um die Bildung von Aussagen, Fragen und Verneinungen im Present Continuous und die Verwendung von Present Simple bzw. Present Continuous.

Video: Present Continuous: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung

Vertiefung

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen
Englische Version

The present continuous (also called present progressive or "Verlaufsform der Gegenwart") consists of two parts. The auxiliary to be (am, is, are in the present) and the ing-form of the verb. I stress this, since numerous students think that any ing-form is also a continuous form - but far from it: you need both parts to form a continuous form (otherwise it could be a gerund or a participle).

For the continuous form, you do not have to do as much thinking as for the simple form (although the latter is apparently simple). You've got an auxiliary and your verb and simply change the word order for questions (auxiliary before the subject - and add an interrogative if needed) and add not for negative forms.

Study these examples:

Statements

  • He is having breakfast at the moment.
  • She is playing tennis.
  • I am typing something.

Questions

  • What is he doing?
  • Is she playing tennis?
  • What am I doing?

Negatives

  • He is not playing tennis.
  • She is not having breakfast.
  • I am not listening.

Bildung (Formation)

Video: Present Continuous: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung

Das present continuous (auch present progressive (deutsch: Verlaufsform der Gegenwart) besteht aus zwei Teilen:

Gegenwartsform von to be als auxiliary verb + -ing Form des main verbs:

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

He is walking home from school right now.

Das gilt auch, wenn eine Form von to be als main verb benutzt wird. Der Satz enthält dann einfach zwei Formen von to be, nämlich auxiliary und main verb:

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

Tom is nasty. Tom is being nasty. (being = auxiliary)

Merke

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

Nur wenn beide Teile vorkommen, handelt es sich um das present continuous. -ing Formen können auch in einem Gerundium (gerund) oder Partizip (participle) vorkommen.

Fragen (Questions)

Bei Fragen im present continuous musst du immer nur die Wortstellung verändern, indem du das Hilfsverb vor das Subjekt ziehst: auxiliary - subject - main verb

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

She is playing tennis at the moment.  Is she playing tennis at the moment?

Verneinungen (Negatives)

Füge not zwischen auxiliary und main verb ein.

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

She is playing tennis at the moment. She is not playing tennis at the moment.

Hinweis

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

Hinweis zur Rechtschreibung

Wie beim Anhängen anderer Endungen (z.B. -ly beim Adverb), müssen auch beim Anhängen von -ing ein paar Besonderheiten bei der Orthographie berücksichtigt werden:

  • Verb endet auf -e: -e fällt weg (move - moving)
  • Verb endet auf -ee: -ee bleibt (see - seeing)
  • Verb endet auf kurzem Vokal + Konsonant: Endkonsonant wird verdoppelt (spin - spinning)
  • Verb endet auf -ie: -ie wird zu -y (die - dying)
  • Verb endet auf kurzem Vokal + -l: -l wird im britischen Englisch verdoppelt (travel - travelling)

Verwendung I: Present Simple und Present Continuous im Vergleich (Use: Comparison of Present Simple and Present Continuous)

Vertiefung

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen
Englische Version:

On the one hand, you have to be able to form different grammatical forms; verbs are of paramount importance in this regard. On the other hand, the forms have to be used correctly. In other words, just because the verb form you used exists in the English language, that does not mean it is the correct form in the specific context. Sadly, some students are notoriously bad at actually using verb forms in the right form. So, in this and the following sections, I'll try and shed some light on when you actually use the present continuous or the present simple.

The Continuous Form

Look at the following examples of the word play:

  1. Listen! Simon is playing the guitar.
  2. Simon plays in a band.
  3. Simon plays about 3 concerts a month.

As you can see, I have used the present continuous in sentence one and the present simple in sentences two and three. In the first sentence, I want to express that Simon is playing the guitar right now. That means he is in the middle of playing. Let's say he started ten minutes ago and will continue to play for another 20 minutes.

THe action (grey) is unfinished and happening now.
Present Continuous

It is important that the action is unfinished and happening now. However, the action does not have to take place in the exact same moment at which you say something about it. You can also use the continuous form to describe a trend or something that is only temporary:

  1. My friends are working on a new song at the moment.
  2. My friends are experimenting with new sounds.

Both sentences say that My friends are doing something which is not finished: My friends haven't finished experimenting and they haven't finished working on their new song. Nonetheless, they might not be working on the song or experimenting with new sounds at the exact same moment at which say the sentence; they are rather working on it intermittently, i.e. suppose they need 5 rehearsals to come up with the final version of their new song. Let's say they've done 2 already. That means they are in the middle of that process, and that is why you use the continuous form here.

The Simple Form

Think of sentence two (above: "Simon plays in a band.") for a moment: Is Simon playing? (i.e.: Is Simon playing now?) The answer is: No, he isn't. So, he is not playing the instrument at the moment. At least, it is irrelevant if he is playing now or not. The point is that he generally plays in a band. It's a statement that is true all the time. The fact that he plays in a band is constant.

In sentence three of my initial examples (Simon plays about three concerts a month.) it is important that he does something on a (more or less) regular basis, i.e. the action is repeated and not only temporary. Thus, you can think of an action on a timeline for the present simple in two different ways: Either the point is that a statement is always true or the point is that an action is repeated again and again:

THe present simple is used either for something that is true in general or for repeated actions.
Present Simple: generally true (left) or repeated (right)

Signal Words

Some teachers provide lists with signal words on them. Like this:

present simplepresent continuous
sometimes, always, usually, never, occasionally, rarely, etcat the moment, at present
every day, every week, every...currently, presently
nowadays, these days,...today, now, ...

Howevery, these kinds of approaches have to be treated with caution. While the words might be indicative of present simple or continuous in most cases, you cannot solely rely on them. They work to emphasise the meaning of the verb form. Consider these examples:

  1. I usually wear a shirt, but today I'm wearing a T-shirt. (key words work fine)
  2. In the past people used typewriters; today, they use computers. (key words don't work here!!)

Why do the signal words work well in sentence one? - The answer is that they support the idea expressed by the verb. The word today is used literally in the first example and indicates that the action (wearing a T-shirt) is temporary (just today) and unfinished (I'm still wearing it; the day is not over yet etc.). In the second example, though, today has a metaphorical meaning: nowadays. What you can learn from this is that it is much more important to get a sound grasp of the underlying concept of a verb form in English than to memorise signal words (,which is a good start and can help to get acquainted with the ideas, but it's clearly not sufficient!).

When Writing...

When writing summaries, analyses (plural of analysis) and other texts in your (final) exams, be careful with simple and continuous aspects. In most cases, especially when you talk about what happens in a novel (or another text), you use the present simple. Let me give you a few examples:

  1. The novel 'Brave New World' describes a possible future.
  2. In chapters 1-3, the reader learns about the World State and the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre.
  3. As the novel unfolds, John gets to know society and finds out what is actually meant by the World State's motto.
  4. When John's mother dies, he finally starts a revolt.
  5. Mustapha Mond explains the system of 'Brave New World' and banishes Bernhard and Helmholtz.
  6. In chapter 18, John kills himself.

In some grammar books the simple aspect is referred to as the "unmarked" form and the continuous (or perfect) aspect is a "marked" form, indicating that normally the simple form is used and that you use the continuous aspect for special emphasis, e.g. an ongoing development. For example, when speaking about the reception of Brave New World, you could say: "The reception of Brave New World is slowly changing." This means that people are starting to read Brave New World differently from how they read it previously.

Remember: When you talk about a plot, you normally use the present simple to talk about it, irrespective of whether the action takes place in the past, present, or future. It is a book: everytime you open it, John kills himself in chapter 18; it is thus not an exception or temporary, but a constant.

Over to you!

What does this mean for your writing? What I would suggest is that you go through previous exams, look through the mistakes you made and see if they revolve around simple and continuous forms, then you could start out by rewriting your sentences using the correct forms.

Use II: Additional Use

You may have noticed that not everything concerning the use of present continuous mentioned in the introduction has been explained yet. Below you find an overview of important functions:

1. Something is happening in the moment of speaking: Listen! Simon is playing the guitar.

2. You are talking about a continuous process: My friends are working on a new song.

3. You want to stress a development: I am regretting my decision to buy the house. (I am regretting it more and more...)

4. Something is done so frequently (always, constantly, forever) that it is typical/characteristic for a certain person/group of people. The connotation is in most cases negative: He is always losing his keys. She is constantly changing her mind.

5. Something is done regularly at a certain point in time: I am having dinner at 7 pm on Sundays. At 8 o'clock I am driving home from work, so phone me on my mobile.

6. Planned activities in the future especially if they are related to travelling. Context and/or adequate adverbials make clear that you are talking about the future: We are spending next winter in Australia. He is arriving tomorrow morning on the first train.

Hinweis

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

Verbs that perform the action they describe occur in present simple within grammatically positive sentences (e.g. admit, apologise, promise, deny or confess)

The Present Tenses in Typical Context

So far the tenses have been treated in isolation and not been embedded into an actual context of use. Take a look at the following examples:

1. Sports commentary: In live commentaries the rule "in the moment of speaking = continuous" does not apply. Fast actions happening in the moment of speaking are described using present simple whereas continuous states that can be seen as forming some kind of background are described using present continuous.

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

Owen passes to Neville. Neville makes a quick pass to Baines. Baines is ahead of his opponents, but he is losing his advantage.

2. Narratives: To make a story that happened to us in the past sound more exciting it may be told in simple present. Present continuous is in this case used to narrate background information whereas present simple is used for important/sudden events.

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

I am driving along this country road and I have no idea where I am. Then I see this old man. He is leaning against a gate. I stop the car and ask him the way.

Auf der einen Seite musst du natürlich die verschiedenen Verbformen kennen und bilden können. Auf der anderen Seite musst du aber auch wissen und verstehen, welche Form im jeweiligen Kontext die richtige oder passendste ist. Worauf es bei der richtigen Verwendung der simple oder continuous form grundsätzlich ankommt, wirst du jetzt lernen:

The Continuous Form

Lies dir die Beispielsätze mit play durch:

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

1. Listen! Simon is playing the guitar. (continuous)
2. Simon plays in a band. (simple)
3. Simon plays about 3 concerts a month. (simple)

Nur Satz eins steht im present continuous, während die Sätze zwei und drei im present simple stehen. Der Unterschied besteht darin, dass Simon im ersten Beispielsatz gerade jetzt, im Moment der Äußerung spielt. Deshalb kann man ihn auch spielen hören (Listen!). Er hat vor einiger Zeit sein Gitarrenspiel begonnen und wird es auch in der nächsten Zeit nach der Äußerung weiter fortsetzen:

THe action (grey) is unfinished and happening now.
Present Continuous (Grauer Balken = Gitarrenspiel)

Es ist im ersten Beispielsatz wichtig, dass die beschriebene Handlung unvollendet ist und im Moment des Sprechens vollzogen wird. Dieses "im Moment des Sprechens" kann aber auch etwas weniger eng und wörtlich gefasst werden. Die beschriebene Handlung kann nämlich auch ein andauernder Prozess sein:

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

4. My friends are working on a new song at the moment.

5. My friends are experimenting with new sounds.

In beiden Sätzen sind My friends mit etwas beschäftigt, dass noch nicht zum Abschluss gekommen ist. Es kann sein, dass sie "im Moment des Sprechens" nicht im Proberaum stehen, sondern vielleicht gerade Auto fahren oder ähnliches. Aber wenn sie erst 3 von 5 erforderlichen Proben hinter sich haben, nach denen ihr neuer Song fertig sein wird, befinden sie sich in einem andauernden und nicht abgeschlossenen Prozess. Das kommt durch die Verwendung des present continuous zum Ausdruck.

The Simple Form

Schau dir erneut Beispielsatz zwei an:

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

2. Simon plays in a band.

Ist Simon jetzt gerade im Proberaum und spielt in einer Band? Die Antwort lautet, dass der Satz hierzu keine Informationen enthält und es für die Aussage irrelevant ist, was Simon "im Moment des Sprechens" macht. Relevant ist nur die Tatsache, dass Simon grundsätzlich in einer Band spielt. Die Wahrheit dieser Aussage ist unabhängig davon, was Simon gerade konkret tut.

Eine ähnlich allgemeine Aussage über Simon findet sich in Satz drei:

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

3. Simon plays about three concerts a month.

Simon hat also jeden Monat in etwa drei Auftritte und diese Aussage ist allgemein gültig. Der Satz bringt zum Ausdruck, dass Simon regelmäßig und wiederholt Auftritte hat.

Wenn du dir die Aussagen im present simple auf einem Zeitstrahl vorstellst, sieht es folgendermaßen aus:

THe present simple is used either for something that is true in general or for repeated actions.
Present Simple: Grundsätzlich wahr (links) oder wiederholte Handlung (rechts)

Links: Simon plays in a band. Rechts: Simon plays about three concerts a month.

Signalwörter (Signal Words)

Es wird manchmal auch auf bestimmte Signalwörter hingewiesen, auf die present simple oder present continuous folgen soll:

present simplepresent continuous
sometimes, always, usually, never, occasionally, rarely, etcat the moment, at present
every day, every week, every...currently, presently
nowadays, these days,...today, now, ...

Solche Signalwörter können zwar nützlich sein, du solltest dich aber nicht ausschließlich auf sie verlassen:

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

6. I usually wear a shirt, but today I'm wearing a T-shirt.

7. In the past people used typewriters; today, they use computers.

Die Signalwörter in Beispielsatz 6 sind tatsächlich Signalwörter und werden in ihrem wörtlichen Sinn gebraucht. In Beispielsatz 7 liegt aber eine metaphorische Bedeutung von today, im Sinne von nowadays (heutzutage), vor. Das present continuous ist also nicht angebracht.

Texte verfassen (Writing Texts)

Wenn du in deinen Klausuren eine Zusammenfassung, Analyse oder anderen Text schreibst, musst du genau auf die richtige Zeitform achten. In den meisten Fällen, besonders wenn du etwas über einen Roman oder anderen Text schreibst, wirst du das present simple benutzen:

  • The novel 'Brave New World' describes a possible future.
  • In chapters 1-3, the reader learns about the World State and the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre.
  • As the novel unfolds, John gets to know society and finds out what the World State's motto actually means.
  • When John's mother dies, he finally starts a revolt.
  • Mustapha Mond explains the system of 'Brave New World' and banishes Bernhard and Helmholtz.
  • In chapter 18, John kills himself.

In manchen Grammatikbüchern wird simple als "unmarked" und continuous als "marked" bezeichnet. Dies ist der Fall, weil die simple form als neutralere Form angesehen wird, während mit der continuous form der Verlauf besonders hervorgehoben wird. Nur ca. fünf Prozent aller verb phrases stehen in einer continuous form (present/past continuous). Im mündlichen Sprachgebrauch kommen sie jedoch häufiger vor.

Merke

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

Wenn du etwas über eine Roman- oder Filmhandlung schreibst, benutze das present simple. Dabei spielt es keine Rolle, ob die Handlung in der Vergangenheit, Gegenwart oder Zukunft spielt.

Deine Klausuren

Schau dir deine alten Klausuren daraufhin an, ob du bei der Verwendung von present simple oder present continuous häufig Fehler machst. Wenn das der Fall ist, sollte dir die Korrektur jetzt leichter fallen.

Verwendung II: Weitere Verwendungsmöglichkeiten (Use II: Additional Use)

Dir ist vielleicht aufgefallen, dass zur Verwendung des present continuous noch nicht alles besprochen wurde, was die Einleitung versprochen hat. Hier findest du wichtige Verwendungsmöglichkeiten im Überblick:

1. Etwas passiert im Moment des Sprechens: Listen! Simon is playing the guitar.

2. Es handelt sich um einen andauernden Prozess: My friends are working on a new song.

3. Eine Entwicklung wird betont: I am regretting my decision to buy the house. (Ich bereue es zunehmend...)

4. Etwas wird so oft getan (always, constantly, forever), dass es für eine bestimmte Gruppe oder Person in typisch ist. Es kann eine negative Bewertung des Verhaltens mitschwingen: He is always losing his keys. She is constantly changing her mind.

5. Etwas wird regelmäßig zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt getan: I am having dinner at 7 pm on Sundays. At 8 o'clock Iam driving home from work, so phone me on my mobile.

6. Geplante Aktivitäten oder Ereignisse, die in der Zukunft liegen, besonders wenn es ums Reisen geht. Kontext und/oder eine passende adverbiale Bestimmung müssen deutlich machen, dass es um die Zukunft geht: We are spending next winter in Australia. He is arriving tomorrow morning on the first train.

Hinweis

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

Wenn ein Verb die Handlung ausführt, die es beschreibt, steht es in (grammatisch) positiven Sätzen im present simple. Dazu gehören beispielsweise admit, apologise, promise, deny oder confess.

Die Gegenwartsformen im Kontext (The Present Tenses in Typical Context)

Bisher wurden die Zeitformen noch nicht in einen Äußerungszusammenhang eingebettet, in dem man die Zeiten auch tatsächlich verwendet. Die folgenden zwei Sprechstituationen eignen sich besonders dafür, die beiden Formen zu verwenden:

1. (Sport)Kommentar (Sports commentary): Bei Livekommentaren gilt nicht "im Moment des Sprechens" = continuous. Schnelle Abläufe die im Moment des Sprechens passieren, werden hier im present simple beschrieben, während andauernde Prozesse, also Verläufe, im present continuous beschrieben werden.

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

Owen passes to Neville. Neville makes a quick pass to Baines. Baines is ahead of his opponents, but he is losing his advantage.

2. Erzählungen (Narration): Damit eine Geschichte, die uns in der Vergangenheit passiert ist, interessanter klingt, wird sie gern in der Gegenwartsform erzählt. Das present continuous wird dann für die Darstellung von Hintergründen verwendet, während wichtige Ereignisse im present simple erzählt werden.

Beispiel

Hier klicken zum Ausklappen

I am driving along this country road and I have no idea where I am. Then I see this old man. He is leaning against a gate. I stop the car and ask him the way.

Lückentext
Bitte die Lücken im Text sinnvoll ausfüllen.
1. At 7 o'clock in the morning I my teeth.
2. When Paul was late again, the teacher complained: "You late for class, Paul!"
3. I a lot of meat, but today I a meat free day!
4. We to New York next week!
0/0
Lösen

Hinweis:

Bitte füllen Sie alle Lücken im Text aus. Möglicherweise sind mehrere Lösungen für eine Lücke möglich. In diesem Fall tragen Sie bitte nur eine Lösung ein.

Bild von Autor Daniel Stodian

Autor: Daniel Stodian

Dieses Dokument Present Continuous: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung ist Teil eines interaktiven Online-Kurses zum Thema Englisch Grammatik Crashkurs.

Daniel Stodian verfügt über langjährige Erfahrung auf diesem Themengebiet.
Dieser Inhalt ist Bestandteil des Online-Kurses

Englisch Grammatik Crashkurs

abiweb - Abitur-Vorbereitung online (abiweb.de)
Diese Themen werden im Kurs behandelt:

[Bitte auf Kapitelüberschriften klicken, um Unterthemen anzuzeigen]

  • Willkommen im Grammatik Crashkurs für dein Englisch Abitur!
    • Einleitung zu Willkommen im Grammatik Crashkurs für dein Englisch Abitur!
  • Adjektiv und Adverb im Englischen: Erklärung, Bildung und Verwendung
    • Einleitung zu Adjektiv und Adverb im Englischen: Erklärung, Bildung und Verwendung
    • Wie werden Adjektive und Adverbien im Englischen gebildet und gesteigert?
  • Nomen im Englischen - Bildung Singular und Plural
    • Einleitung zu Nomen im Englischen - Bildung Singular und Plural
    • Much, many, some, any: Erklärung und Übung
    • Few, little, fewer, less: Unterschied und Übungen
  • Gegenwartsformen im Englischen (Present tenses)
    • Einleitung zu Gegenwartsformen im Englischen (Present tenses)
    • Present Simple: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Present Continuous: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
  • Vergangenheitsformen im Englischen (Past tenses): Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Einleitung zu Vergangenheitsformen im Englischen (Past tenses): Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Present perfect simple: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Present perfect continuous: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Past simple: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Past perfect simple: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Past perfect continuous: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
  • Zukunftsformen im Englischen (Will-future): Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Einleitung zu Zukunftsformen im Englischen (Will-future): Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Going-to-future: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Future perfect: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Future (perfect) continuous: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
  • Passiv im Englischen in allen Zeitformen: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Einleitung zu Passiv im Englischen in allen Zeitformen: Erklärung, Bildung und Übung
  • Defining Relative Clauses: Beispiele und Übungen
    • Einleitung zu Defining Relative Clauses: Beispiele und Übungen
    • Non-Defining Relative Clauses Erklärung und Übungen
  • Konditionalsätze Im Englischen (If-Clauses): Erkärung, Bildung und Übung
    • Einleitung zu Konditionalsätze Im Englischen (If-Clauses): Erkärung, Bildung und Übung
    • If-Sätze: Typ 1 (Erkärung, Bildung und Übung)
    • If-Sätze: Typ 2 (Erkärung, Bildung und Übung)
    • If-Sätze: Typ 3 (Erkärung, Bildung und Übung)
  • Indirekte Rede im Englischen: Regeln und Übungen
    • Einleitung zu Indirekte Rede im Englischen: Regeln und Übungen
  • Partizip im Englischen: Erklärung und Übungen
    • Einleitung zu Partizip im Englischen: Erklärung und Übungen
    • Gerundium: Erklärung und Übungen
  • Wortarbeit
    • Einleitung zu Wortarbeit
    • Wortwiederholungen: Vermeidung im Englischen
    • False Friends im Englischen
    • Phrasal Verbs: Liste und Übungen
    • Modalverben im Englischen (Modal verbs): Erklärung und Ersatzformen
  • Kollokationen im Englischen
    • Einleitung zu Kollokationen im Englischen
    • Kollokationen mit take
    • Kollokationen mit put
    • Kollokationen mit get
    • Kollokationen mit Verb und Präposition
    • Kollokationen mit Adjektiv und Nomen
  • Präpositionen im Englischen
    • Einleitung zu Präpositionen im Englischen
    • Präpositionen des Ortes und der Richtung im Englischen
    • Präpositionen der Zeit im Englischen
    • Weitere Präpositionen, Stellung der Präpositionen und feststehende Ausdrücke im Englischen
  • 92
  • 28
  • 320
  • 68

Unsere Nutzer sagen:

  • Miriam

    Miriam

    "Ich finde abiweb.de sehr hilfreich und die Themen sehr gut erklärt!! Vielen Dank!!"
  • Jens

    Jens

    "Endlich habe ich es verstanden :) Ich schreibe morgen meine Klausur und denke, dass ich es nun kann :)"
  • Michaela

    Michaela

    "Vielen Dank:) Wäre schön wenn sich meine Lehrerin so viel Zeit für alles nehmen könnte."